COVID-19 AND OUR KIDS

Image result for empty playgroundAre you wondering what you should tell your kids in a time like this?  They know something unusual is happening. They are home from school. The store shelves have never been so empty.  Restaurants are closed to dining. You can’t go to the movies, the zoo, or the gym. And then there’s church. Most likely you’ll be attending church from your living room this week.  What is going on? Inquiring young minds want to know.

Our go-to verse for how to disciple our own children is Deuteronomy 6:4-7. Listen, Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. Love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your strength. These words that I am giving you today are to be in your heart. Repeat them to your children. Talk about them when you sit in your house and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up (CSB). This same idea is then repeated in Deuteronomy chapter 11.  I’ll sum it up this way. Take every opportunity to talk with your kids. And when you do, make sure the subject is the Lord.

Talk to your kids.  They already know something unusual is happening in the world.  You can’t keep them from seeing that things have changed. So tell them why and then use it as an opportunity to point them to the Lord.  You might say, “times are different, but the Lord promised to take care of us, so we’re trusting in Him.” Show them passages in the Bible that speak of God’s care.  Passages like Matthew 6:25-34, Hebrews 13:5-6, and Romans 8:31-39.

Be real as you talk with your kids. It’s okay to let them know you’re learning and growing too.  There may be times when you’re concerned and you have to remind yourself of these promises God gave.  It’s good for them to see you growing in your faith. It’s good to see that you have to keep turning to the Lord for help and encouragement.  One more thing. Pray with your kids. Let them pray with you. They will learn a lot about praying by how you pray. So worship the Lord in your prayers, make heartfelt requests, and thank Him for what He has done.

Every moment matters.  Timely words are needed, but our kids need to see how our faith impacts every part of our life.  You have probably heard the statement, “Do as I say, not as I do.” That’s a bad statement. People learn by example and here in this text Moses tells the people to Talk while they sit, walk, lie down, and get up.  That covers a lot of ground. Your faith is not segmented from the rest of your life.  It is your life. It affects every part of what you do. It becomes the reason you make the choices you make, it’s your source of joy, peace, and happiness, and it’s the passion that pushes you along to love the Lord and others.  Your kids need to see that. 

So what should we be showing our kids in times like these?  First, don’t panic. They can see panic and your panic causes them to panic.  Stay calm, check your phone occasionally, not constantly, for updates on the situation and learn what to share and what not to.  Second, check up on others to see how they’re doing. Let your kids see you doing this. Whether it’s family, neighbors, friends, or coworkers, let them see you caring for others.  Offer to pray with and for others and then pray with your kids about the people you’re reaching out to. Third, stay connected to your church. This is a great opportunity to show our kids that church is more than a building and Sunday morning worship service.  It’s people. We’re here for each other. We may not be meeting in large groups, but we’re still the body of Christ. We can still love each other and encourage growth in Christ.

So let me wrap this up.  We have times to sit and talk about the Lord. It’s important we do that. Read scripture, pray, and share how you’re growing. Ask questions and make sure your kids know you’re interested in their walk with the Lord too.  Then, live out your faith in every way. Show them what it means to trust the Lord in the good and bad times. Let them know that your faith in the Lord is the reason you have peace. Your greatest impact on the future generation starts in your home.  And under the current conditions, you have more time at home.

Involved in Christ,
Pastor Ryan

COVID-19 AND OUR KIDS

COVID-19 and Anxiety

Image result for COVID-19We met to worship yesterday. We talked about our God who knows all, and is in complete control. We submitted our prayers, thanked Him, read scripture, and encouraged others who were there. I was happy to be there to worship. 

Today, I find myself anxious. In fact, after a great day of worship, I didn’t sleep well. I’m watching events happen around me that I’ve never seen in my lifetime. People are worried. I’m worried. God tells us, “Don’t worry about anything, but in everything, through prayer and petition with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. 7 And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus” (Philippians 4:6-7 CSB). So simple, yet so hard to follow. So here are 3 things I’m worried about and my plan to follow God’s instruction in this passage to present my request, be thankful, and allow God’s peace to rule my heart. I hope it encourages you.

  1. I’m worried the concern over COVID-19 is just the tip of the iceberg and the global economic impact to follow will be great. Not only will we have a virus to contend with, but also a depressed economy. –Lord, please give our nation’s leaders great wisdom to guide us through this time of uncertainty.  May they be calm, but decisive. Help them make decisions that slow down COVID-19 with minimal impact on the economy. Provide for those who may be out of work during this time. Thank you for the people who help us make these decisions. Thank you for the hours they spend looking over statistics and listening to the countless concerns. Give them peace and let us rest in peace knowing that you’re helping them navigate their way through uncharted waters.
  2. I’m worried that people are getting an emotional “buzz” over COVID-19 and it’s causing more problems than needed. I’ve found myself doing this. It’s kind of exciting. Not in a good way, but I feel interested, my thoughts are consumed, and I’m thinking of creative ways to limit our use of essentials for the next month, or more. Lord, help me trust in your promises and remain calm. You say you love us more than the birds of the air and the Lilies of the field. Since you take care of them, you take care of us. The future is uncertain in our eyes, but you know every minute of everyday and our lives are in your hands. Thank you for always hearing our prayers. Thank you for never leaving us. Thank you for giving us your Son that guarantees hope for the hopeless and life to all who call on His name. May the peace that comes from these promises rule our hearts. Remind us daily of the truths you have given and the love you have shown us through your Son, Jesus.
  3. I’m worried the church is going to miss an opportunity to shine hope and truth to so many that are worried and concerned. In times like this, the church should be the example of how to stay calm, rest in the certainty of the creator, and care for the hurting. We must not let the worries consume us as well. Lord, please help the church be the example you called us to be. People will know we are your disciples by how we treat each other. We are not here to hoard items, but give items. We are not here to criticize leaders, but submit to and pray for them since they are placed in leadership by God. We are not here to complain, but lead with respect and understanding. Thank you for the church. They are the people I need to keep me focused on the important things. Thank you for their prayers, encouragement, and listening ears. Thank you for the hope we have in Jesus and for the confidence that no matter what happens the church will survive until God’s appointed time. Let your peace rule in our hearts. The confidence we have is in your unshakable character. You’re not surprised. You’ve got this. As we rest in you, may the world see our hope and be more attracted to the peace we have in you than they are to the chaos and fear caused by uncertainty.

So what are you worried about? Try this three step approach from Philippians 4:6-7. 1) Present your request, 2) Give thanks – there’s always something to be thankful for, and 3) let God’s peace rule your hearts. It’s a great way to grow. 

COVID-19 and Anxiety

Involve Training Center

involve training center temp logo

Overview of the Opportunity

This post follows an announcement made in yesterday’s worship service that was accompanied by a handout which can be found here.

Since Involve started, several people have asked the question: “Is Involve looking to buy a building?”  Our answer has been simple.  We see a building as a tool for discipleship and if owning a building helps us disciple people better, than yes!  We would consider buying a building.  We want to be defined by our mission and not our building.  Our mission is to Involve people in an authentic relationship with Jesus Christ.  Whether we are in a mobile church setting or a permanent facility, we want to maintain our focus and stay the course.  It’s about discipleship at Involve and you all have helped make that possible. Continue reading “Involve Training Center”

Involve Training Center

Involve Church to Offer Accredited Ministry Courses and Degrees

ben-white-148430We are excited to announce that, beginning September 2017, Involve Church will be offering accredited ministry courses and degree programs in partnership with Antioch School for Church Planting and Leadership Development.  This will provide those wishing to pursue further theological education an option that is financially accessible and sustainable without leaving the ministry environment of the local church.

How did this come about?

It’s no secret that we are a new church, planted by other churches, moving into our third year.  From its very start, Involve Church has been about church planting for the sake of reaching people with the message that there is forgiveness and new life in Jesus, as well as seeing them grow in following God.  As we planned to start a church centered around that central message and purpose, we knew that we wanted to a be a church plant that planted churches.

While discipleship has been and will increasingly be an important part of Involve Church, we knew we needed an option that would take our leader and church planter training to the next level while at the same time allowing people to continue serving in the context of the local church.  Through a contact with our sister church in Boise, ID, we were connected with Antioch School and are now certified to begin offering degree programs.

We see this as a great option for further equipping people to carry out the Great Commission without having to uproot their lives to move to bible college or seminary.  As a church, we are excited to continue to move towards becoming a church for training leaders and church planters.

jonathan-simcoe-227321What degrees do you offer?

We offer:

Classes can also be taken for individual credit.  For more information on the degree programs, please email luke@involvechurch.com.

How much does it cost?

This is one of the more exciting aspects of the partnership.  For a four-year degree program, the student will spend around $8,000.  This is significantly less than other institutions offering similar degrees.

How do I get more information?

We will have periodic informational gatherings.  Catch this upcoming Sunday’s at 11:45am.  If you’d prefer, you can schedule a meeting with Pastor Luke to talk through the options one-on-one.


Involve Church exists to involve people in an authentic relationship with Jesus Christ.  To find out more about Involve Church, please visit involvechurch.com or email info@involvechurch.com

Involve Church to Offer Accredited Ministry Courses and Degrees

Coming Together

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The church body was designed by God to accomplish several jobs.  Together, we worship the one true God, we work side by side to share the good news across the world, and we wear each others triumphs, burdens, and trials as a way of encouragement for one another.  Our church has experienced a heavy burden with the loss of Mason Cunningham.  We are experiencing this burden together with the Cunninghams.  Our hearts go out to the family as they grieve the loss of their little boy.

If you are unaware of the situation, Mason, who is about 18 months old, passed away suddenly, this week.  Mason, who was just enjoying life outside Tuesday evening, got too close to the creek behind the house. In a very short time, he fell in.  The family searched long and hard, joined by a team of professionals from the Nampa/Caldwell area.  Unfortunately, they were not able to recover Mason until the next morning.

Both Wade and Kristina are hurting greatly.  I’ve watched them parent Mason and can say with confidence, that they have done a fantastic job of being attentive to his needs.  This is one of those times, when, as a parent, you think everything is safe and somehow, in a very short time, a little one gets away.  They did everything humanly possible to retrieve Mason.

We are a church family.  We rejoice together, we cry together, and right now we are crying.

We are a church family.  We rejoice together, we cry together, and right now we are crying.  We hurt for the Cunninghams, but we will walk this road together with them.  Already, you, the church, have shown them so much love.  Keep it up!  They need us.  They need Christ.  That’s what we do, we Involve people in the life of Christ.  Together, we are the body of Christ. Together, we live for Christ.  Together, we bear each other’s burdens for the honor and glory of Jesus Christ.

There is a memorial service planned for Mason this Saturday, August 5th at 10:30 a.m.  It will be held at Meridian First Baptist Church.   428 W Pine Ave, Meridian, ID 83642

Involved In Christ,

Pastor Ryan

Coming Together

Bible in a Year, Week 30

WELCOME TO WEEK 30!

Welcome to week 30!  As a reminder – if you have questions, feel free to reach out by emailing info@involvechurch.com or messaging a pastor on Facebook.

THE PLACE IN THE STORY

This week we finish up the place in the story in which the people of Israel have returned from exile in Babylon.  We will move into “The Prophets after the Exile,” starting with Daniel.  Daniel is unusual because it actually spans a period of time of the entire exile. Want to read ahead?  Access the plan here.  If you want to browse the videos put out by The Bible Project (there are a lot), subscribe to and browse their YouTube channel.

VIDEOS

Esther

Daniel

Ezra-Nehemiah

THIS WEEK’S READING

  • July 23:  Nehemiah 7-9, Psalm 49
  • July 24:  Nehemiah 10-11, Psalm 50
  • July 25:  Nehemiah 12-13, Psalm 51
  • July 26:  Esther 1-5, Psalm 52
  • July 27:  Esther 6-10, Psalm 53
  • July 28:  Daniel 1-3, Psalm 54
  • July 29:  Daniel 4-6, Psalm 55
  • July 30:  Daniel 7-9, Psalm 56
  • July 31:  Daniel 10-12, Psalm 57

To find out more about Involve Church, visit involvechurch.com or email info@involvechurch.com.

Bible in a Year, Week 30

Bible in a Year, Week 29

WELCOME TO WEEK 29!

Welcome to week 29!  As a reminder – if you have questions, feel free to reach out by emailing info@involvechurch.com or messaging a pastor on Facebook.

THE PLACE IN THE STORY

This week we move from Israel in Exile to the Return from Exile.  This is the period of time when the people of Israel are allowed to return to their land and rebuild their country.  It is during this time that both Ezra and Nehemiah find their setting.  Want to read ahead?  Access the plan here.  If you want to browse the videos put out by The Bible Project (there are a lot), subscribe to and browse their YouTube channel.

VIDEOS

Ezra-Nehemiah

THIS WEEK’S READING

  • July 16:  Ezekiel 40-44, Psalm 42
  • July 17:  Ezekiel 45-48, Psalm 43
  • July 18:  Ezra 1-3, Psalm 44
  • July 19:  Ezra 4-7, Psalm 45
  • July 20:  Ezra 8-10, Psalm 46
  • July 21:  Nehemiah 1-3, Psalm 47
  • July 22:  Nehemiah 4-6, Psalm 48
  • July 23:  Nehemiah 7-9, Psalm 49
  • July 24:  Nehemiah 10-11, Psalm 50

To find out more about Involve Church, visit involvechurch.com or email info@involvechurch.com.

Bible in a Year, Week 29

Bible in a Year, Week 28

WELCOME TO WEEK 28!

Welcome to week 28!  As a reminder – if you have questions, feel free to reach out by emailing info@involvechurch.com or messaging a pastor on Facebook.

THE PLACE IN THE STORY

Ezekiel is a long collection of prophecies – we won’t finish reading through Ezekiel until next week.  If you haven’t yet had a chance, make sure to check out the videos provided below on Ezekiel.  It helps greatly with understanding this prophet who ministered during the Exile of Israel to Babylon.  Also, there are topical videos on “The Law” and “Holiness” available as well.  Want to read ahead?  Access the plan here.  If you want to browse the videos put out by The Bible Project (there are a lot), subscribe to and browse their YouTube channel.

VIDEOS

Ezekiel 1-33

Ezekiel 33-48

The Law

Holiness

THIS WEEK’S READING

  • July 9:  Ezekiel 19-21, Psalm 35
  • July 10:  Ezekiel 22-24, Psalm 36
  • July 11:  Ezekiel 25-27, Psalm 37
  • July 12:  Ezekiel 28-30, Psalm 38
  • July 13:  Ezekiel 31-33, Psalm 39
  • July 14:  Ezekiel 34-36, Psalm 40
  • July 15:  Ezekiel 37-39, Psalm 41
  • July 16:  Ezekiel 40-44, Psalm 42
  • July 17:  Ezekiel 45-48, Psalm 43

To find out more about Involve Church, visit involvechurch.com or email info@involvechurch.com.

Bible in a Year, Week 28

Bible in a Year, Week 27

WELCOME TO WEEK 27!

Welcome to week 27!  As a reminder – if you have questions, feel free to reach out by emailing info@involvechurch.com or messaging a pastor on Facebook.

THE PLACE IN THE STORY

Believe it or not, our place in the story is still “The Prophets of the Exile, Part 2,” but we are coming to a close with this section in the next week.  We dive into Ezekiel this week.  Here is some info on the prophet Ezekiel:

Ezekiel, a prophet and priest, was exiled to Babylon in 597 b.c. His ministry extended over at least twenty-three years. The book opens with his first dramatic vision of the “likeness” of the Lord himself. Ezekiel was keenly aware of God’s presence and power in human affairs. He addressed both the exiles and the people left in Judah with messages of warning and judgment, predicting the fall of Jerusalem. After Jerusalem’s fall (in 586), Ezekiel prophesied hope and reassurance for the people of Judah, who had then lost the focus of God’s covenant, the temple in Jerusalem. His vision of the valley of dry bones (ch. 37) is a classic picture of God’s ability to renew his people. [The Holy Bible: English Standard Version (Wheaton: Standard Bible Society, 2016), Eze.]

Want to read ahead?  Access the plan here.  If you want to browse the videos put out by The Bible Project (there are a lot), subscribe to and browse their YouTube channel.

VIDEOS

Ezekiel 1-33

Lamentations

THIS WEEK’S READING

  • July 2:  Lamentations 3, Psalm 28
  • July 3:  Lamentations 4-5, Psalm 29
  • July 4:  Ezekiel 1-4, Psalm 30
  • July 5:  Ezekiel 5-8, Psalm 31
  • July 6:  Ezekiel 9-12, Psalm 32
  • July 7:  Ezekiel 13-15, Psalm 33
  • July 8:  Ezekiel 16-18, Psalm 34
  • July 9:  Ezekiel 19-21, Psalm 35

To find out more about Involve Church, visit involvechurch.com or email info@involvechurch.com.

Bible in a Year, Week 27

Bible in a Year, Week 26

WELCOME TO WEEK 26!

Welcome to week 26!  As a reminder – if you have questions, feel free to reach out by emailing info@involvechurch.com or messaging a pastor on Facebook.

THE PLACE IN THE STORY

We continue reading through the prophet Jeremiah this week and then we move into Lamentations.  Here is some info on Lamentations:

The book of Lamentations is made up of five poems, each an expression of grief over the fall of Jerusalem. Like a eulogy at a funeral, these laments are intended to mourn a loss—in this case, the loss of a nation, Israel. The latter half of chapter 3 implies that the purpose behind the book’s graphic depictions of sorrow and suffering was to produce hope in the God whose compassion is “new every morning” (v. 23) and whose faithfulness is great even to a people who have been condemned for their own unfaithfulness. The author, while not identified in the book itself, may have been the prophet Jeremiah, who was said to have “uttered a lament for Josiah” (2 Chron. 35:25). Lamentations was probably written shortly after Jerusalem’s fall in 586 b.c. (Borrowed from The Holy Bible: English Standard Version (Wheaton: Standard Bible Society, 2016), La.)

Want to read ahead?  Access the plan here.  If you want to browse the videos put out by The Bible Project (there are a lot), subscribe to and browse their YouTube channel.

VIDEOS

Jeremiah

Topical Video – the Law

Lamentations

THIS WEEK’S READING

  • June 25:  Jeremiah 33-36, Psalm 21
  • June 26:  Jeremiah 37-39, Psalm 22
  • June 27:  Jeremiah 40-44, Psalm 23
  • June 28:  Jeremiah 45-48, Psalm 24
  • June 29:  Jeremiah 49-50, Psalm 25
  • June 30:  Jeremiah 51-52, Psalm 26
  • July 1:  Lamentations 1-2, Psalm 27
  • July 2:  Lamentations 3, Psalm 28
  • July 3:  Lamentations 4-5, Psalm 29

To find out more about Involve Church, visit involvechurch.com or email info@involvechurch.com.

Bible in a Year, Week 26